Salesforce picks AWS as preferred public cloud provider

Salesforce named Amazon Web Services as its preferred public cloud provider for services like Sales Cloud, Service Cloud and App Cloud, expanding an existing partnership to provide the backend for the software-as-a-service provider.

AWS already hosts several Salesforce services like Heroku, SalesforceIQ and the recently announced IoT Cloud. This latest deal will help Salesforce to expand internationally without having to build its own data centers to comply with local data sovereignty laws. 

That’s important as Salesforce tries to pick up more customers in countries that have strict requirements about where data is stored. Salesforce isn’t the only company to turn to AWS in this capacity: Dropbox will store data with AWS in Germany starting later this year

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Q&A: three top picks for cloud computing companies?

Question by touroneinc: three top picks for cloud computing companies?
for example , google i think is one , what are two more?

Best answer:

Answer by Aron R
First, a definition of “cloud computing”:

“Utility computing … also called cloud computing, on-demand computing and software as a service [SaaS] … exists when the user accesses software and/or data from computing resources located on the network.”

There are such a wide variety of options available that you may wish to clarify further what you’re looking for. Two examples:

If what you’re seeking is online storage and processing cycles, perhaps for a Web-based startup company, you might look into Amazon Web Services (e.g. S3, EC2):

http://aws.amazon.com

If what you are looking for is a SaaS customer relationship management (CRM) system, one obvious option is Salesforce.com:

http://www.salesforce.com

Some advantages of SaaS:

http://www.smallbiztrends.com/2007/12/software-as-a-service-expect-to-see-more-of-it.html/

The primary disadvantage is that you’ve put your eggs into a “cloud” basket; if your provider’s service goes down or is otherwise unreachable, your business may be dead in the water for a time. Some thoughts on this:

http://radar.oreilly.com/2008/07/oscon-day-2-prophet-your-path.html

Add your own answer in the comments!