Ivanka Trump's Punk Phase and Ted Cruz's Tweeting Top This Week's Internet News

Following a week in which Twitter announced a schedule to try and make the platform less awful and the Scaramucci Post seemed hellbent on proving all of its critics right, it’s important to take a moment to think about what’s really important in life.

Please remember @catsu as you explore the mixed bag of randomness the internet offered over the last seven days. It might be the only thing that will keep you sane.

Punk as … Huh?

What Happened: Of all the Trump children, which one do you think is the most likely to have listened to Nirvana and really felt bad when Kurt Cobain died? The answer may surprise you, if you were thinking Eric or Donald Jr.

What Really Happened: Even this far into our relationship with the First Daughter, Ivanka Trump knows how to surprise us all, it seems.

The story came from Ivanka’s latest memoir, Raising Trump, in which she writes about her “punk phase in the nineties,” when she was “really into Nirvana.” Twitter was, shall we say, somewhat unconvinced:

While the media reported on Ivanka’s Twitter dragging, someone realized folks could simply go back and look at photos of Ivanka during this punk phase and see the evidence first-hand:

The Takeaway: Oh, it’s easy to mock, but there are always more layers to the truth than people think.

Thank You for Your Service

What Happened: If there was one issue being discussed more than any other on social media last week, it was the ways in which a president should console grieving military families.

What Really Happened: In one of the stranger moments of political theater in recent months—an increasingly competitive space, let’s be honest—President Trump responded to a question about his lack of comment on the deaths of US soldiers in Niger by criticizing President Obama over whether or not he’d called families of fallen soldiers. Trump, of course, said that he would certainly call the families of the dead soldiers when he felt it was appropriate, which seemingly turned the whole incident into an even bigger embarrassment for all involved.

Wait. What? The report came from US congresswoman Frederica Wilson (D-Florida), a friend of the family of Army Sgt. La David Johnson, who heard Trump’s call to his widow on speakerphone. “We were in the car together, in the limousine headed to meet the body at the airport,” Wilson would later tell CNN’s Don Lemon. “So I heard what he said because the phone was on speaker.” Twitter was … not impressed.

While all of this undoubtedly looked bad for the president, it was almost certain that the White House would announce that he didn’t actually say that…

OK, sure; WH spokesperson Sarah Huckabee Sanders might not have denied it, but the president himself certainly did.

How could he have not? After all, it’s the perfect defense for him, considering that the reports had come from a representative of the opposing party. And it’s not as if the widow herself had confirmed the report. Sure, the soldier’s mother did confirm it, but all that really meant was that the back-and-forth was on.

Let’s not forget that the president said he had proof that Wilson was lying. What kind of proof was he talking about?

It would turn out, days later, that there’s apparently an official transcript of the call which, inexplicably, the president’s family has apparently read. But if White House chief of staff John Kelly was present, surely he—a military veteran who has lost his own son in service—would back up the president.

Oh… Good?

The Takeaway: Well, at least the president didn’t speak to any other grieving parents.

Melania, Is That You?

What Happened: As if 2017 wasn’t strange enough already, last week Americans found themselves asking, “What if the First Lady of the United States wasn’t actually the First Lady of the United States?”

What Really Happened: This one is surreal and wonderful. Early last week, the president made a public appearance accompanied by his wife Melania. Except, to some, she didn’t quite look like Melania.

For whatever reason—paranoia, boredom, the sheer glee of starting such a ridiculous meme—the internet quickly embraced the possibility that Melania Trump had been replaced by someone else in public appearances.

Unsurprisingly, mainstream media couldn’t resist joining in on such a dumb, great idea. One report even claimed credit for the Fake Melania idea in general, suggesting that the real deal is currently hiding in “a small town somewhere in Missouri, where she works on a volunteer basis at a center offering counseling and support to refugees and immigrants.” Well, it’s not impossible

The Takeaway: If nothing else, it’s a silly enough idea that people want to believe it.

Here’s Another Clue for You All

What Happened: Sometimes, it might not be the best idea to try and reclaim a meme that involves you being a serial killer.

What Really Happened: Hey, remember that meme that perpetuated the idea that US senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) was the Zodiac Killer? Well, last week Cruz himself got in on the joke.

…Yes, really. That’s not a mistake, or even the kind of thing that is claimed to be a mistake after the fact; Ted Cruz actually tweeted out a letter from the Zodiac Killer. There is, of course, context for why he did this, but why ruin everything by looking at facts?

Not everyone was a fan of Cruz participating in his own meme, however.

Certainly, while the media was thrilled Cruz was joining in, some believed that he had killed the joke by doing so. Then again, maybe there was an entirely different reason for Cruz to post the meme.

Does he? And how has that worked out for him?

So, yes. It’s all going swimmingly, if that was his intent. Good job, Ted!

The Takeaway: Before we leave Cruz to ponder how much the senator has embarrassed himself here, let’s appreciate the very best response of all.

(Get it? No? Read this.)

Louder Than Bombs

What Happened: In the case of Florida v. Richard Spencer, the Sunshine State came out on top.

What Really Happened: White supremacist, alt-right leader, and punch receiver Richard Spencer had a public appearance at the University of Florida last Thursday. It was certainly something that seemed like a big deal ahead of time, with the state governor declaring a state of emergency before the event, fearful of violent protests. And, sure enough, ahead of the actual appearance, everyone was very aware of the possibility of something going down.

Sure enough, at the event itself, there were protests—but they didn’t go the way anyone expected.

Also: Campus bells played “Lift Every Voice and Sing” as Spencer prepared to take the stage. Only two arrests were made, according to local police, and Spencer was stymied and humiliated.

The Takeaway: Still. White supremacist speech? There has to be a better way to describe that…

Tech

Russian Spies Rush to Exploit the Latest Flash Zero Day and More Security News This Week

There’s nothing like a hefty security freakout to start the week, and the Key Reinstallation AttackWi-Fi vulnerability—you know it as Krack—announced on Monday fit the bill. The bug is in the ubiquitous WPA2 Wi-Fi protocol, so while it fortunately doesn’t impact every single device that exists, it does affect a significant portion of them. And many will likely never receive protective patches, a longstanding and critical security problem that particularly affects the Internet of Things. The relative simplicity of the Krack bug itself also highlights the importance of making technical standards accessible to researchers for review and feedback.

Google announced a new tier of account security this week called Advanced Protection that uses physical authentication tokens, advanced scanning, and siloing to help defend particularly at-risk accounts (or anyone who wants to be very cautious). And after its disastrous corporate breach, Equifax is receiving a thorough public shaming. Researchers also discovered that for just $ 1,000 they can exploit mobile advertising networks to track people’s movements in both cyberspace and the real world. Not great!

US-Iranian relations are tense and could nudge Iran’s cyber operations. And crooks have a new favorite hustle called “cryptojacking” that can secretly use your devices to mine cryptocurrency when you visit infected websites. Highs and lows.

And there’s more. As always, we’ve rounded up all the news we didn’t break or cover in depth this week. Click on the headlines to read the full stories. And stay safe out there.

Flash Patched Its Recent Zero Day, So Russian Hackers Are Using It While They Can

Kaspersky Labs researchers announced a new Adobe Flash vulnerability on Monday, noting that unidentified hackers exploited the bug in an attack on October 10, using a compromised Microsoft Word document to deliver FinSpy malware. Adobe coordinated with Kaspersky to issue a patch on the day of the disclosure. In the wake of the patch, researchers at the security firm Proofpoint observed the hackers doubling down to exploit the flaw before potential targets widely adopt the fix. The group, which Proofpoint says is the Russia-backed collective Fancy Bear, launched an email spearphishing campaign that targeted state departments and aerospace companies. But researchers say the operation was sloppy, and that the group has followed this pattern in the past.

Microsoft Didn’t Disclose 2013 Breach of a Sensitive Vulnerability Database

Sophisticated hackers breached Microsoft’s internal vulnerability-tracking database more than four years ago, but the company didn’t publicly disclose the incident. Five former Microsoft employees told Reuters that the company was aware of the intrusion in 2013. The database would have contained critical vulnerabilities in Microsoft’s widely used software products, including Windows, and may have even included code for exploiting those flaws. Such information would be a gold mine for foreign government-backed hackers or third-party criminals alike, and could have facilitated breaches and espionage at the time.

Reuters’ sources said in separate interviews that Microsoft never connected the breach to any other attacks, and that the company didn’t disclose the incident, because doing so would have pushed attackers to exploit the vulnerabilities before they were patched. Microsoft presumably patched everything in the compromised database years ago, though. Reuters’ sources say that the Microsoft did at least improve its internal security in response to the hack. The incident was part of a rash of attacks that also hit Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. The group behind these hacks is still unidentified, but is known by different researchers as Morpho, Butterfly, and Wild Neutron, and is still active today.

UK Concludes That Iran, Not Russia or North Korea, Hacked Officials’ Email Accounts

Investigators in the United Kingdom concluded last week that Iranian government-backed hackers were behind a June email network intrusion that targeted numerous members of parliament and Prime Minister Theresa May. Every MP uses the network, but the hackers specifically looked for accounts protected by weak passwords or reused ones that had leaked online after other breaches. The parliamentary digital services team told the Guardian that it was making email security changes in response to the attack. The incident underscores Iran’s ongoing digital offensive initiatives. Though the country has been less focused on Western targets in the last few years, it is still an active threat around the world. Recently, US President Donald Trump has worked to undermine the Iran nuclear deal, but Theresa May and other European leaders say they want to preserve it.

Police Did Social Media Surveillance on New York Black Lives Matter Group

The Black Lives Matter Global Network chapter in the Rockland County, New York filed a federal lawsuit in August claiming that local Clarkstown police conducted illegal surveillance on it throughout 2015. Clarkstown police records from the Strategic Intelligence Unit describe social-media surveillance targeted at BLM members. The documents even show evidence that a lead detective told the Strategic Intelligence Unit supervisor to stop the surveillance, but this didn’t end the program. BLM is alleging that Clarkstown police engaged in racial profiling, and violated the group members’ rights to free speech and assembly.

Millions of Crucial Cryptography Keys Weakened By Trusted Generator

A flaw in how a popular code base generates cryptographic keys has ruined the security of millions of encryption schemes. The generator appeared in two security certification standards used my numerous governments and large corporations worldwide, meaning that the flawed keys are meant to protect particularly sensitive platforms and data. German chipmaker Infineon developed the software, which has included the key generating flaw since 2012 or possibly earlier. Attackers could exploit the bug to figure out the private part of a key from its public component. From there they could do things like manipulate digitally signed software, disable other network protections, or, of course, decrypt sensitive data. The situation affects Estonia’s much-touted secure digital ID system. Infineon, Microsoft, and Google warn that the flaw will undermine their Trusted Platform Module products until customers generate new, more robust keys. Estonia has announced plans to update the keys used for its national IDs.

Tech

Get Ready for Video Ads on Your LinkedIn News Feed

But sponsored content is limited to a few advertisers and mobile devices—for now.

LinkedIn is testing sponsored videos that will run in users’ news feeds.

On Thursday, the social network—now part of Microsoft–said that it is testing sponsored videos with a limited number of advertisers.

These will not be pre-roll or post-roll ads, which play at the beginning or end of a selected web page. Instead, these ads will play right from a user’s LinkedIn feed. As you scroll down, you will see the video just as you would see other content. But the video will be labeled as “promoted.”

Marketers increasingly see video as the best way to reach business audiences, and LinkedIn says its tools and data can help those advertisers target the optimal audience. Because the LinkedIn database knows what members do for a living, their job titles, and who they work for, that targeting gets just that much easier.

Related; Here’s What LinkedIn Could Mean for Microsoft Azure Cloud

The select advertisers, which include Prudential Financial Services and Microsoft Canada, will be able to reach specific audiences based on the aforementioned member profile information.

Initially, the ads will run only on mobile, not desktop devices. LinkedIn offers reporting tools to help advertisers track how many people viewed the ad at all and how many watched it all the way through. The company also started letting users embed their own videos a few months ago.

Related: LinkedIn Claims Half a Billion Users

LinkedIn claims more than 500 million users, yet it does not disclose daily active user count or break out how many people are paying customers. The network offers free basic services, but charges human resources, sales, and marketing professionals for additional features and capabilities.

Microsoft msft dropped $ 26.2 billion to buy LinkedIn last year, so there’s pressure to make that investment pay off. Ads could help with that. Microsoft is also tying LinkedIn and its user data trove tightly into its Dynamics business software so that a user of Microsoft’s sales software can easily find prospects for campaigns from LinkedIn without leaving that application.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

LinkedIn faces competitors on several fronts—not the least of which is Facebook fb , the social network which as of June claimed two billion users. Over the past year, Facebook has been pushing more into business applications with job postings and Workplace.

Tech

News Roundup: Ariana Grande Releases ‘Problem’ Video, Queen Announces New Album, and More

This week, pop star Ariana Grande released the official music video for her hit song “Problem,” which features female MC Iggy Azalea. Check it out below. Also, Queen announced that they are going to release a new album. All that and more below. Queen Announces New Album: Queen guitarist Brian May revealed that the band […]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/beatcrave/~3/3MCj70-8nk8/

Zooey Deschanel Aaliyah Abbie Cornish Adriana Lima Adrianne Curry Adrianne Palicki

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TV news anchor triggers Alexa to attempt ordering dollhouses

Last year, I was gifted an Amazon Echo; stunned, I stared at the gifter and thought to myself, have you ever met me…do you know me at all? The side of the Echo box listed features, starting with “fair-field voice control, with 7-microphone array and beam-forming technology to hear you from across the room.” Echo didn’t leave the box for six months.

When I finally did open Echo, I was interested in comparing functions of Echo against those of ZOE; the latter smart home assistant was developed by Protonet with privacy in mind – nothing goes to the cloud so it couldn’t be turned into a surveillance device.

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Google Drive Search Gets a Natural Language Boost, More News

Google is bringing the powerful natural language processing (NLP) technology that underlies its search engine to Google Drive. In a blog post announcing the move  this week, Josh Smith, product manager at Google Drive, described NLP as a fancy way of saying “search like you talk.

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Google Drive Search Gets a Natural Language Boost, More News

Google is bringing the powerful natural language processing (NLP) technology that underlies its search engine to Google Drive. In a blog post announcing the move  this week, Josh Smith, product manager at Google Drive, described NLP as a fancy way of saying “search like you talk.

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