Dunkin' Donuts Has a Stunningly Simple New Trick So You'll Get Your Coffee Faster

In New England, people love their Dunkin’ Donuts.

Heck, I was in a Dunkin’ Donuts in Massachusetts once, and a guy showed me how you could actually see two other Dunkin’ Donuts from the parking lot of the first Dunkin’ Donuts.

But for all of Dunkin’ Donuts regional ties, the company has its sights set on world domination. And as corporate leaders explained this week, they’re using some surprising tricks–some of them so simple you’ll wonder why nobody else is doing them–in order to get there.

A lot of this comes down to how fast Dunkin’ Donuts can get a cup of coffee into your hands, so it can turn around put another cup of coffee in somebody else’s hands. (Maybe an egg sandwich, too.)

The more quickly they move you through, the more customers they can serve, and the more money they make. Basic math. 

So, they’ve got a couple of short, simple words for you: “drive-thru,” and “mobile app.” 

It’s all on display now at the company’s new “next generation concept store” in Massachusetts. Pull up to the drive-thru there, and you’ve got a choice of two lanes.

There’s the regular drive through, where cars line up, order, wait their turn, and pick up their coffee and food–pretty much like every other drive-thru lane in the world.

But, there’s also an “exclusive On-the-Go drive-thru lane,” as Dunkin’ Donuts calls it in a press release, that lets you skip ahead of all the other customers, and go right to the front of the line. Think of it as first class for coffee.

What do you have to do in order to fly first class at Dunks? Join their “DD Perks” rewards program, and place your order via your phone on the Dunkin’s Mobile App.

It’s a pretty simple concept, and if you’re from New England like me, it might even strike you as “wicked smart.”

Dunkin’ Donuts certainly isn’t the first restaurant to try to push people to order via an app–but they claim to be the first national restaurant to combine it with the drive-thru.

In retrospect, it’s almost obvious, given that industry wide, between 30 and 70 percent of customers reportedly use drive-thrus. (The wide range has a lot to do with individual restaurants’ focuses, and the times of the day that customers visit.)

Now, it will probably tick some people off in the short term, at least the first few times they show up and realize that they have to wait longer than other customers because they’re paying in cash or with a credit card.

A lot of them will convert, though, because if you grab a coffee on the way to work each day, and if using the “On-the-Go” lane saves you 90 seconds each time because you’re not stuck behind somebody else putting in their order–that could add up to six hours a year.

There are some other smaller changes being tested in the new “next generation store,” (which happens to be about a mile from the original Dunkin’ Donuts location from 1950). Among them: a tap system for cold beverages, electronic order kiosks, and greater energy efficiency.

They also want to convince you that Dunks is a place to visit in the afternoon, and open hundreds more stores outside of the northeast. And they’re getting rid of their foam cups.

But I’m going to put my money on the “mobile-preferred” drive-thru ordering experiment as the smartest, simplest innovation. 

There’s some history, too: This is the company whose lineage includes the entire concept of franchising restaurants in the United States–years before McDonald’s started doing it–and leveraged it to build Dunkin’ Donuts into a national name.

Oh, right. The name. I almost forgot. They’re dropping the “Donuts” part of it soon. They should just go with Dunks, since that’s what everyone calls them in New England anyway, but apparently they want to change to just “Dunkin’.”

Alibaba kicks off sponsor deal in Pyeongchang

PYEONGCHANG (Reuters) – Alibaba Group Holding Ltd (BABA.N) is launching a project that will create a “smarter” and more connected athletes’ village and stadia and make all Olympics stakeholders “more money”, its executives said on Saturday.

Many of Alibaba’s plans are still concepts since it has not had enough time to implement its technology after signing a deal last year worth hundreds of millions of dollars as a cloud and e-commerce partner with the International Olympic Committee.

But IOC president Thomas Bach said some of Alibaba’s plans “can become operational pretty soon” while Alibaba founder Jack Ma said they expected to be realized at the next Winter Games in Beijing in 2022.

“We want to make the Olympic Games so everyone can make more money,” Ma said, adding that “everyone” meant groups such as host cities’ organizing committees, athletes and sponsors.

Alibaba is one of the few top Olympics sponsors signed with the IOC until 2028.

It has said it wants to upgrade the technology that keeps the Games running.

It also unveiled its “sports brain,” on Saturday, a suite of software products designed to improve the back office of how sports events are run.

Ma, who appeared onstage with Bach, said he was moved by North Korea and South Korea marching together in the opening ceremony on Friday since it reflected “peace and prosperity”.

Former NBA player Yao Ming was in the audience at the media conference, which featured an interpretive dancer and a magician pulling a bird out of a hat.

Alibaba has about 200 to 300 employees on the ground in Pyeongchang to study how the games run and help find ways to save future host countries money.

Alibaba’s Tmall and Taobao shopping platforms dominate online retail in China. But it is not well known in many parts of the world, including in the United States where Amazon.com Inc is the e-commerce leader.

It is using an international branding campaign focused on the Olympics to help introduce it to markets such as the United States and Great Britain.

Editing by Greg Stutchbury

Exclusive: China's Ant plans equity fundraising at potential $100 billion valuation – sources

HONG KONG (Reuters) – China’s Ant Financial Services Group is planning to raise up to $5 billion in fresh equity that could value the online payments giant at more than $100 billion, people familiar with the move told Reuters.

A fundraising would bring Ant, in which e-commerce firm Alibaba Group Holding Ltd is taking a one-third stake, a step closer to a hotly anticipated initial public offering by establishing a more current valuation.

Ant’s last fundraising in 2016 valued the owner of Alipay, China’s top online payment platform, at about $60 billion. The new round should start with a valuation of between $80 billion to $100 billion, the people said.

Ant is currently in talks to appoint advisers for the fundraising which is expected to be launched in the next couple of months, they added.

Ant declined to comment on its fundraising plans. All the people spoke to Reuters on the condition they not be identified due to the sensitivity of the issue.

While no timetable for an IPO has been set, nor any location yet chosen, Ant’s plans are being viewed as a pre-IPO fundraising, the people said. A pre-IPO round is an increasingly common move by sought-after Chinese companies to establish valuations and widen their investor base ahead of going public.

It was not immediately clear how the company plans to use the fresh cash.

The exact timing and size of the fundraising still depends on investor feedback but any deal will add to an already hectic pace of domestic and offshore fundraising by Chinese tech firms that are looking to expand both at home and abroad.

Chinese e-commerce firm JD.com is raising funds for its logistics unit with a target of attracting at least $2 billion, while live-video streaming start-up Kuaishou is nearing the close of a $1 billion funding round, sources have said.

Ant’s own existing investments include stakes in Paytm, the Indian mobile payment and e-commerce website, and Thai financial technology firm Ascend Money.

Last month, however, Ant suffered a setback when a U.S. government panel rejected its $1.2 billion offer for money transfer company MoneyGram International over security concerns.

At home, in addition to its core online payments business, which Ant says has 520 million yearly users, the company also offers wealth management, credit scoring, micro lending and insurance services.

Last week, Alibaba announced it would take a 33 percent stake in Ant – replacing the current system where Alibaba receives 37.5 percent of Ant’s pre-tax profit – in what was viewed as an important step ahead of any IPO.

Alibaba set up Alipay in 2004, modeling the business on PayPal, to help Chinese buyers shop online, and later controversially spun it off ahead of its own listing in 2014. Jack Ma, Alibaba’s founder, controls Ant, according to Alibaba filings with the U.S Securities and Exchange Commission.

Ant is considered by some analysts as one of the most valuable Alibaba assets due to its unique position in Chinese e-commerce.

Current shareholders in Ant include large state-owned institutions such as China Life Insurance, China Post Group – parent of Postal Savings Bank of China – and a unit of China Development Bank.

Reporting by Sumeet Chatterjee and Julie Zhu; Additional reporting by Kane Wu; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman and Edwina Gibbs

Anime, technology on offer as Japan promote 2020 Games

GANGNEUNG, South Korea (Reuters) – Traditional paper cranes and some of the latest technology are on offer as Japan seeks to promote itself as the host of the next Olympic Games in 2020, with organizers hoping to inherit the enthusiasm and fervor of Pyeongchang 2018 hosts.

Tokyo will host the summer games for the second time, following the tremendously successful 1964 Olympics, and organizers have brought a large delegation to Pyeongchang to learn how to host them successfully.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will also arrive in South Korea on Friday to attend the opening ceremonies.

But on Thursday it was all about introducing the fun side of Japan at the Tokyo 2020 Japan House, which opens to the public as the Games officially get going on Friday.

People stand next to a machine which prints photographs of the visitors during the Tokyo 2020 Japan House media preview in Gangneung, South Korea, February 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

On offer were cameras allowing visitors to imprint their face on paper used to make traditional folded cranes and others that create life-size avatars that then romp through typical Tokyo street scenes on a huge screen.

“We will see an unprecedented run of three consecutive Olympics in Asia – Pyeongchang 2018, Tokyo in 2020 and Beijing in 2022 – a chance for all Asia to cooperate to make these fun,” said Yukihiro Nunomura, Chief Operating Officer at Tokyo 2020.

Slideshow (6 Images)

“Pyeongchang will start this off and we expect this to be a huge success and that this baton can then be passed to Tokyo, so we inherit their enthusiasm and fervor.”

The Tokyo 2020 games will be Japan’s fourth run at the Olympics. Besides Tokyo in 1964, it has hosted the Winter Games twice – Sapporo in 1972 and Nagano in 1998.

Tokyo planners have struggled with surging costs and construction delays, especially with the new national stadium, but the International Olympic Committee has repeatedly said it is pleased with how preparations are going.

Reporting by Elaine Lies and Jack Tarrant, writing by Elaine Lies; Editing by Amlan Chakraborty

Snap Touts Snapchat Redesign as Revenue, User Growth Send Shares Soaring

Less than a year after Snapchat’s parent company went public with a flop, Snap Inc. is finally hinting at the possibility of a rosier future after posting surprising quarterly revenue- and user-growth that beat Wall Street’s expectations for the first time ever.

On Tuesday afternoon, Snap said fourth-quarter revenue jumped 72% year-over-year, to $285.7 million, along with adjusted loss of 13 cents per share, compared to analysts’ revenue forecasts of $253 million and a 16 cent per share loss. Meanwhile, ephemeral messaging service Snapchat also saw its user base grow faster than expected, adding 8.9 million daily active users to reach 187 million, the biggest quarter-to-quarter jump since the third quarter of 2016.

The positive news sent shares of Snap soaring more than 23% in after-hours trading on Tuesday to $17.32, as investors showed renewed confidence in Snapchat’s ability to add new users to help it compete with larger social media rivals like Facebook and Facebook-owned Instagram. Investors had been concerned that Snapchat’s user growth rate would continue to slow amid mounting competition from Facebook and its subsidiary, especially since Instagram’s 2016 launch of its Snapchat-copying Stories feature.

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While Snapchat has long been considered popular among younger users, the service must prove it can also appeal to users in older demographics in order to drive further growth and appease advertisers looking to reach users with more spending power. To that end, Snapchat has been teasing a redesign of its mobile app aimed at attracting older users by making it easier to use.

News of the redesign initially spooked investors, and the changes have only trickled out to small test groups, so far. But CEO Evan Spiegel offered reassurances in a letter to investors on Tuesday in which he said that tests of the redesign led to users watching more Stories from media companies and spending more time viewing ads.

“We believe that the redesign has also made our application simpler and easier to use, especially for older users,” Spiegel wrote. “Compared to the old design, core metrics around content consumption and time spent in the redesigned application are disproportionately higher for users over the age of 35, which bodes well for increasing engagement among older users as we continue to grow our business.”

While reports last month suggested that users were responding negatively to Snapchat’s redesign, Spiegel expressed confidence today that the changes will help the company continue to build on its most recent quarter of user growth, and thus boost revenue.

Capacity alone won't assure good cloud performance

Many people believe that workloads in the cloud always perform better because public clouds have access to an almost unlimited amount of resources. Although you can provision the resources you need—and even use serverless computing so the allocation of resources is done for you—the fact is that having the right amount of resources is only half the battle.

To get good cloud performance means you have to be proactive in testing for performance, not be reactive and wait for an issue to arrive in production. After all, performance depends on much more than raw capacity.

I strongly encourage testing. If you’re using devops to build and deploy your cloud application workloads, your testing for security, stability, and so on are typically done withcontinuous testing tools as part of the devops process.

But what about performance testing?

Truth be told, performance testing is often an afterthought that typically comes up only when there is a performance problem that the users see and report. Moreover, performance usually becomes an issue when the user loads surpass a certain level, which can be anywhere from 5,000 to 100,0000 concurrent sessions, depending on the application. So you discover a problem only when you’re got high usage. At which point you can’t escape the blame.

An emerging best practice is to build in performance testing into your devops or cloud migration process. This means adding performance tests to the testing mix and look at how the application workload and connected database deals with loads well beyond what you would expect.      

This means looking for a performance testing tool that is compatible with your application, the other devops tools you have, and the target cloud platform where the application is to be deployed. Of course, a “cool tool” itself is not the complete answer; you need testing engineers to design the right set of testing processes in the first place.      

Ironically, although devops itself ( as both a process and tool set) is all about being proactive in terms of testing, most devops processes that I’ve seen don’t do much performance testing, if any at all.     

Withouth that testing, you can’t answer the question “When will my cloud workload hit the performance wall?” Instead, your users find out for you, and you may discover it’s time to look for a new job.         

Tesla Strikes Deal to Give 50,000 Australian Homes Solar Power

The state government of South Australia announced Sunday that it had struck a deal with Tesla to install as many as 50,000 solar-power systems on homes, at no cost to residents.

The system would include both solar panels and Tesla Powerwall batteries, and would become part of a decentralized electric grid managed by software. The system would be funded in part by revenues from electricity, which would not belong to the owners of the homes where the systems were installed.

A pilot version of the program has already begun, and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation spoke to one early recipient whose electric bills had declined substantially. One projection suggested energy bills for participating households would drop by 30%.

The first wave of installations are planned to roll out to about 24,000 government-owned housing units. After that, other South Australians would be able to participate, with a goal of 50,000 participating households within four years. Those homes would be knitted together into what is being referred to as a ‘virtual power plant.’

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Tesla has already made a big splash in South Australia, where late last year it installed the world’s biggest lithium-ion battery as a grid backup system. That system has succeeded dramatically, coming online quickly to prevent blackouts following drops in output from conventional power plants.

The plan may be contingent on the outcome of a March election, in which current South Australian Premier Jay Weatherill faces a challenge from a conservative candidate who opposes specifics of the plan, referring to it as a “reckless experiment.” Weatherill’s opponent, however, also supports large-scale solar installation.

The ambitious plan in Australia could breathe new life into Tesla’s solar efforts. Since acquiring SolarCity (also founded by Musk) in 2016, that unit’s installations have plummeted in the U.S. That has been largely attributed to cuts in marketing efforts. Inking big one-shot deals is likely a higher-margin proposition for solar installations long-term, compared to SolarCity’s previous emphasis on door-to-door retail sales and generous individual financing. Tesla has also recently said it is expanding sales of solar-power systems at Home Depot stores in the U.S.

Exclusive: Broadcom to raise Qualcomm bid in push for talks, sources say

(Reuters) – Broadcom Ltd (AVGO.O) plans to unveil a new approximately $120 billion offer for Qualcomm Inc (QCOM.O) on Monday, aiming to ratchet up pressure on its U.S. semiconductor peer to engage in negotiations, people familiar with the matter said on Sunday.

The move comes ahead of a Qualcomm shareholder meeting scheduled for March 6, when Broadcom is seeking to replace Qualcomm’s board of directors by nominating its own slate for election.

Broadcom is scheduled to meet with its advisers later on Sunday to finalize an offer that values Qualcomm between $80 and $82 per share, two of the sources said. Broadcom’s previous $70 per share offer consisted of $60 per share in cash and $10 per share in stock.

Broadcom also plans to offer Qualcomm a higher-than-usual breakup fee in the event regulators thwart the deal, according to the sources. Typically, such break-up fees equate to approximately 3 percent to 4 percent of a deal’s size.

The sources cautioned that Broadcom Chief Executive Officer Hock Tan may decide to significantly change the terms at the last minute.

The sources asked not to be identified because the deliberations are confidential. Broadcom and Qualcomm did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

FILE PHOTO: A sign on the Qualcomm campus is seen, as chip maker Broadcom Ltd announced an unsolicited bid to buy peer Qualcomm Inc for $103 billion, in San Diego, California, U.S. November 6, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake/File Photo

Broadcom has said it is very confident a deal can be completed within 12 months of signing an agreement. Qualcomm counters that the regulatory review processes required around the world would take more than 18 months and be fraught with risks.

Qualcomm provides chips to mobile carrier networks to deliver broadband and data, making it an attractive acquisition target for Broadcom, which hopes to expand its offerings in so-called 5G wireless technology.

Qualcomm has argued to its shareholders that Broadcom’s hostile bid is aimed at acquiring the company on the cheap.

Qualcomm reported quarterly profit and revenues last week that beat analysts’ expectations as demand surged for its chips used in smartphones and cars. However, its forecast was below estimates due to tepid mobile phone sales in China.

Qualcomm is engaged in a patent infringement dispute with Apple Inc (AAPL.O). Qualcomm has said the litigation is necessary in order to defend is licensing programs.

Qualcomm is also trying to clinch an acquisition of its own, proposing to buy NXP Semiconductors NV (NXPI.O) for $38 billion. The deal was approved by European Union antitrust regulators last month, and only China has yet to approve it. Qualcomm expects the government’s blessing later this month.

The NXP deal still faces an uncertain future as some of its shareholders, including activist hedge fund Elliott Management Corp, have asked Qualcomm to raise its offer. Qualcomm is expected to make a decision later this month.

Reporting by Greg Roumeliotis in New York; Additional reporting by Liana B. Baker in San Francisco; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe

The Sound of a Cyber Bubble Popping

The cryptocurrency market is in a meltdown. Bitcoin prices are down nearly 60% from their December highs, and major banks are cutting off credit card access to crypto exchanges—no surprise in the wake of a mania that saw everyone and their dog sharing hot crypto tips.

Meanwhile, the cyber-security industry is experiencing its own bubble bursting, albeit in much less dramatic fashion. As Reuters reported last month, investors are at last acknowledging the obvious: There are too many VC-bloated start-ups chasing too few clients, while unicorns are morphing into zombies struggling to find an IPO or other exit.

This situation may explain a recent flurry of press releases from cyber firms like Tenable, Cylance and Duo. The releases tout revenue growth and appear intended to assure anyone who will listen that “hey, we’re surviving the cyber shake-out just fine thank you very much.”

It’s hard to say for now which firms will be left standing at the end of 2018 but, for now, it’s clear the peak of the cyber-boom, when VCs would shower money on any company with blinky lights, is over. The investor uncertainty, though, is just one part of the cyber story. There’s also the more important question of whether all these companies have helped harden the country against hacking, and the answer appears to be yes.

Based on recent conversations with ordinary executives, I’ve found cyber-literary has shot up. While hackers are still getting through (they always will), managers and general counsels are finally attuned to the threat and doing something about it.

This change is also trickling down to more humble enterprises. I met a company this week called CyberSight, which offers free and low-cost ransomware protection to the likes of small businesses and county governments, and many of them are actually implementing it. This is a welcome change from a year ago when too many companies blew off cyber defense as an exotic affair they didn’t need.

So let’s celebrate cyber victories where we can find them. Finally, returning to crypto, don’t forget it’s tax time—if you bought or sold, here’s a plain English Q&A to get you through. Have a great weekend.

Jeff John Roberts

@jeffjohnroberts

[email protected]

Welcome to the Cyber Saturday edition of Data Sheet, Fortune’s daily tech newsletter. You may reach Robert Hackett via Twitter, Cryptocat, Jabber (see OTR fingerprint on my about.me), PGP encrypted email (see public key on my Keybase.io), Wickr, Signal, or however you (securely) prefer. Feedback welcome.

THREATS

Bye-bye little bots: Twitter users are losing tens of thousands of followers in the wake of a searing report about a “follower factory” that let people inflate their social media popularity with the help of bots, many of which were crafted by means of identity theft. A Twitter board member was among those who lost followers in the purge.

Apple and the FBI, it’s complicated: In the wake of a 2016 terrorist attack, media outlets (including Fortune) reported on bad blood between Apple and law enforcement over the iPhone maker’s encryption polices. Today, the two sides still don’t see eye-to-eye but are in many ways more friendly than you think.

Looming specter of Spectre: Sure enough, those scary Spectre and Meltdown viruses may be coming to a chip near you. Researchers have already found 130 malware samples that appear to have been built in order to exploit the worldwide chip vulnerabilities disclosed in January.

Netflix and Phish: When you have 118 million subscribers, many of them addicted to binge-watching, your service will be a popular target for scammers. A fake Netflix subscription email is making the rounds (again), threatening to cancel Netflix customers’ accounts if they don’t supply their credit card number. One guess what happens if you click.

Hey Hawaii, good call on canning that button pusher who kept confusing drills with real life. 

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ACCESS GRANTED

The robbery caper began in a Ruby Tuesday’s restaurant in Times Square, where Meza met his victim, who had earlier disclosed he was an early investor in Ethereum. The cryptocurrency was once worth pennies but last year soared to over $1,000.

— If you’re going to rob someone at gunpoint for their crypto-currency, for heaven’s sake, don’t transfer the funds to a popular exchange in your own name. Fortune obtained exclusive details about a crazy crypto heist in New York.

ONE MORE THING

Obligatory SuperBowl tidbit: Jeopardy host Alex Trebek chided his contestants over their complete and utter ignorance of football, a topic that regularly pops up in the weeks before the gig game. The show then trolled the players with a tweet, saying “Our contestants answered as many clues in this category as the @Browns had wins this season.”

Don't Waste Your Time Trying to Hire a 'Tom Brady.' Here's a Better Way to Build a Winning Team

By Mattson Newell (@MattsonNewell), Client Relationship Partner at Partners In Leadership and expert and author on Breakthrough Communications, Global Human Resources, and Talent Development.

It’s easy to look at the dynasty that the New England Patriots have built and fall into the trap of trying to hire a Tom Brady. That surely, once you have that superstar in place, it will lead to championships, glory, and bonuses for everyone.

Not everyone remembers that before Brady was the superstar he is today, the sixth-round draft pick who was in a battle to even make the team. From there he was coached and developed. He learned to seize opportunities as they presented themselves. As they say, leaders are made, not born. The same can be said for superstars, too.

Instead of throwing your resources into hiring a superstar for your business, here’s a better way to build a winning team.

1. Develop the right people

The development trap that many leaders fall into is looking for whoever has the best results in the company and then plugging them into a leadership position or development track.

When a very successful SVP of Sales left a Fortune 500 organization, who do you think they tabbed to replace him? That’s right, the person with the highest sales numbers the year before.

You can guess what happened next. The former sales superstar who was excellent at selling and working with clients, struggled in his new SVP role working internally and overseeing the sales team. Within six months he was out the door and the leader was again looking for a new SVP.

Top producers do not always translate into our top leaders. When deciding who the right person is to develop as a leader in your organization, consider the whole person instead of just focusing on numbers and results.

2.  Develop the right plan

Many organizations only put a plan in place to develop their people when they find out a leader is headed out the door. Unfortunately, that is too late.

Succession planning and leadership development should be a constant, thriving, evolving part of your organization at all times, not just when a leader is leaving. It is important to put systems and processes in place to identify, develop, and build bench strength.

Jim Skinner, former CEO of McDonald’s, was known to tell managers: “Give me the names of two people who could succeed you.” This was one way he worked to manage succession planning.

3. Develop the right skills

In a survey conducted by Partners In Leadership, which involved more than 40,000 people from small start-ups to Fortune 50 organizations, over half of those surveyed said that their stated 2020 goal was either an aggressive stretch or a crazy stretch.

But stretch goals are attainable: the Seattle Seahawks won the Super Bowl in 2014 even though they were only two years removed from going 7-9.

What is key is that your team has the skills necessary to achieve a stretch goal. If your current players don’t have what it takes to win, set them up for success by identifying what skills they need. Then provide the right learning opportunities to develop their talent for sustainable results.

By instilling an empowered, continuous learning culture, you’ll be able to maintain a motivated, performance-oriented workforce that isn’t afraid to stretch outside their comfort zone.

Creating Results and Shaping Change

True, it is much less expensive to develop your good people than to go out and try to hire the already-established superstars. But there are more benefits to developing employees than upfront cost-savings.

Employee research consistently shows that career development opportunities are a leading indicator of employee engagement. In a recent study on employee retention, the most important aspect of a company’s reward and recognition program was employee development opportunities.

Having worked with thousands of employees in high-potential programs over the years, we have seen the impact engaged employees have on their companies–both immediately and long after their development, as they move on to significant leadership roles in their organizations.

Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that you need to hire the next ‘Tom Brady.’ Instead, look for the current ‘Tom Brady(s)’ on your team and develop them. Who knows, they might turn out to be your next superstars!